Archive for November, 2004

Kiev Bloggers

November 25, 2004

UPDATE: very thorough list of news sources and blogs here. (Haven’t yet seen the comparable list for ‘the other perspective’… )

Quite a way to keep up with the breathtaking pace of events:

Ukraine: Blogger or Media? (includes a brief analysis and links to several key bloggers)

Discoshaman’s Le Sabot Post-Moderne (including some on-the-spot photos)

The Periscope (compendium of reports from many sources)

Oh, and don’t forget this for a source of recent photos (note some from Kharkov too, which was supposed to be “Yanukovych heartland”!)… I’m deliberately showing the full URL because it’s so neat:

www.flickr.com/photos/tags/ukraine/

Advertisements

November 25, 2004

CNET News.com | Interview with David Temkin, CTO Laszlo Systems David vs. Goliath vs. Goliath

If I’m an application developer and I have a choice between something that is closed and proprietary, that costs $12,000 for two CPUs, and is linked to the Flash 7 client, or I can use an open-source product that offers me wider deployment options because I can use Flash 5 and 6 and it’s unencumbered, what am I going to choose?

Rich web apps, open source, the whole works… worth a read [link via Marc Canter]

November 25, 2004

CNET News.com | Interview with David Temkin, CTO Laszlo Systems David vs. Goliath vs. Goliath

If I’m an application developer and I have a choice between something that is closed and proprietary, that costs $12,000 for two CPUs, and is linked to the Flash 7 client, or I can use an open-source product that offers me wider deployment options because I can use Flash 5 and 6 and it’s unencumbered, what am I going to choose?

Rich web apps, open source, the whole works… worth a read [link via Marc Canter]

November 25, 2004

CNET News.com | Interview with David Temkin, CTO Laszlo Systems David vs. Goliath vs. Goliath

If I’m an application developer and I have a choice between something that is closed and proprietary, that costs $12,000 for two CPUs, and is linked to the Flash 7 client, or I can use an open-source product that offers me wider deployment options because I can use Flash 5 and 6 and it’s unencumbered, what am I going to choose?

Rich web apps, open source, the whole works… worth a read [link via Marc Canter]

Next-gen socially-mediated searching

November 25, 2004

From Joi Ito’s Web: Looking for a blog post…

I remember someone posting a graphic of how an idea spreads across blogs. the image had a “gray area” of instant messenger and email that couldn’t be tracked as easily. I’ve asked a few people who remember seeing the post, but now no one can find it. Does anyone remember it and have the URL? It’s amazing that we remember it, but can’t find it or remember who posted it…

UPDATE: Found! Thanks tarek! Amazing. That was less than one hour after I posted this question. I had been googling for it for a day or so.

The above is a great example of the next generation of searching via social software. Joi couldn’t find the item, and moreover, even as a super-savvy user, Googling around clearly led to many dead end results. Google groups, user forums, and other discussion media can also be highly frustrating in such circumstances. So how about posting the query ‘out there to the Universe’? Anyone out there reading your stuff certainly shares a lot of your interests, and one of those people had the answer.. .and fast!

Schull on “Visualizing Webs of BlogThreads”

November 20, 2004

Continuing the ‘duelling blogs’ theme of me and Stowe in this posting over on Get Real.

Solution to Udell’s “Name That Genre”: Demo-casting

November 16, 2004

Jon Udell asks others to help him name a genre:

As I continue to explore the idea of making movies of software, I’ve been thinking that this medium needs a name… So what should I call the medium — or, as Eric Hanson says, the genre — that I’ve been developing? TechSmith, the company that makes Camtasia Studio, calls it screen recording. Microsoft calls it screen capture. Qarbon uses the term viewlet. The generic term I’ve been using until now is screen video. But none of these is especially catchy, and none really conveys what I’m aiming for. The name I’m seeking would describe:

  • A progressively-downloadable video,
  • which shows interaction with software,
  • as is narrated by a presenter,
  • or as emerges in a conversation.

We use TechSmith’s Camtasia a lot for this… for example I’ve done some BuddySpace demos/tutorials this way, and Simon Buckingham Shum has created some nice Compendium demos/tutorials that he calls Instructional Screen Movies. Although we don’t always stream these progressively in the way Jon is describing, the whole genre involve demos in so many cases that I think the label ‘demo-casting’ or ‘democasting’ is a pretty decent fit. Whaddaya think, Jon?

November 15, 2004

Foreign Policy: Web of Influence

Every day, millions of online diarists, or “bloggers,” share their opinions with a global audience. Drawing upon the content of the international media and the World Wide Web, they weave together an elaborate network with agenda-setting power on issues ranging from human rights in China to the U.S. occupation of Iraq. What began as a hobby is evolving into a new medium that is changing the landscape for journalists and policymakers alike.

Nothing earth-shattering for medium and hardcore bloggers but an interesting article nonetheless in that it (a) chronicles a number of high-profile cases of bloggers influencing mainstream media and political opinion, (b) contains links to some useful resources, and (c) is itself an example of mainstream media taking note. Worth a look!

November 15, 2004

Foreign Policy: Web of Influence

Every day, millions of online diarists, or “bloggers,” share their opinions with a global audience. Drawing upon the content of the international media and the World Wide Web, they weave together an elaborate network with agenda-setting power on issues ranging from human rights in China to the U.S. occupation of Iraq. What began as a hobby is evolving into a new medium that is changing the landscape for journalists and policymakers alike.

Nothing earth-shattering for medium and hardcore bloggers but an interesting article nonetheless in that it (a) chronicles a number of high-profile cases of bloggers influencing mainstream media and political opinion, (b) contains links to some useful resources, and (c) is itself an example of mainstream media taking note. Worth a look!

November 15, 2004

Foreign Policy: Web of Influence

Every day, millions of online diarists, or “bloggers,” share their opinions with a global audience. Drawing upon the content of the international media and the World Wide Web, they weave together an elaborate network with agenda-setting power on issues ranging from human rights in China to the U.S. occupation of Iraq. What began as a hobby is evolving into a new medium that is changing the landscape for journalists and policymakers alike.

Nothing earth-shattering for medium and hardcore bloggers but an interesting article nonetheless in that it (a) chronicles a number of high-profile cases of bloggers influencing mainstream media and political opinion, (b) contains links to some useful resources, and (c) is itself an example of mainstream media taking note. Worth a look!