Archive for September, 2003

September 25, 2003

Jabber Software Foundation: Jabber User Base Surpasses ICQ
“Fast-Growing Open Network Overtakes IM Originator
According to ComScore Media Metrix, ICQ — the original instant messaging (IM) service to gain mass popularity — claimed a declining user base of 6 million in June of 2003. In this same time period, the Jabber Software Foundation (JSF) estimated that there were nearly 10 million end users of software based on the open Jabber/XMPP protocol. While it is difficult to count distinct Jabber users because the network is growing so fast and includes many servers on large corporate intranets, the JSF’s estimate includes more than 4 million paying customers of Jabber, Inc.’s commercial software as well as an estimated 6 million users of open source and other commercial implementations of the Jabber/XMPP protocol.”

September 25, 2003

Jabber Software Foundation: Jabber User Base Surpasses ICQ
“Fast-Growing Open Network Overtakes IM Originator
According to ComScore Media Metrix, ICQ — the original instant messaging (IM) service to gain mass popularity — claimed a declining user base of 6 million in June of 2003. In this same time period, the Jabber Software Foundation (JSF) estimated that there were nearly 10 million end users of software based on the open Jabber/XMPP protocol. While it is difficult to count distinct Jabber users because the network is growing so fast and includes many servers on large corporate intranets, the JSF’s estimate includes more than 4 million paying customers of Jabber, Inc.’s commercial software as well as an estimated 6 million users of open source and other commercial implementations of the Jabber/XMPP protocol.”

September 25, 2003

Jabber Software Foundation: Jabber User Base Surpasses ICQ
“Fast-Growing Open Network Overtakes IM Originator
According to ComScore Media Metrix, ICQ — the original instant messaging (IM) service to gain mass popularity — claimed a declining user base of 6 million in June of 2003. In this same time period, the Jabber Software Foundation (JSF) estimated that there were nearly 10 million end users of software based on the open Jabber/XMPP protocol. While it is difficult to count distinct Jabber users because the network is growing so fast and includes many servers on large corporate intranets, the JSF’s estimate includes more than 4 million paying customers of Jabber, Inc.’s commercial software as well as an estimated 6 million users of open source and other commercial implementations of the Jabber/XMPP protocol.”

September 24, 2003

Wired News: Putting Your Calls Into Context
“a research team at Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute of Technology, or CIT, has developed a new context-aware mobile-phone technology called the SenSay. The SenSay cellular phone, still in prototype stage, keeps tabs on e-mails sent, phone calls made and the user’s location. The phone also adapts to the user’s environment.”

September 24, 2003

Wired News: Putting Your Calls Into Context
“a research team at Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute of Technology, or CIT, has developed a new context-aware mobile-phone technology called the SenSay. The SenSay cellular phone, still in prototype stage, keeps tabs on e-mails sent, phone calls made and the user’s location. The phone also adapts to the user’s environment.”

September 24, 2003

Wired News: Putting Your Calls Into Context
“a research team at Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute of Technology, or CIT, has developed a new context-aware mobile-phone technology called the SenSay. The SenSay cellular phone, still in prototype stage, keeps tabs on e-mails sent, phone calls made and the user’s location. The phone also adapts to the user’s environment.”

September 24, 2003

Truncation bug fix
Like many others (apparently), I had found that on occasion my blog pages were being prematurely truncated. I found the following helpful comment on birdhouse.org :: Web Dev: “…my weblog was truncated halfway down the page in IE6. I’ve had my share of CSS frustrations, but just could not fathom what bug I might have introduced that could cause this. Yesterday I came across this Zeldman post, and another including a workaround. In a nutshell, the flagship browser used by 187% of the surfing population caches the vertical size of DIVs on pure CSS pages. So if it calculates the height of your .blogbody class on one page at 225 pixels, it may try to render it at the same height on subsequent pages, even though it contains different content. Lovely. Some small relief to know this wasn’t my bug.”

Many thanks to the above posters. I’ve borrowed the solution from this workaround, and pasted the raw javascript into my template.

September 24, 2003

Truncation bug fix
Like many others (apparently), I had found that on occasion my blog pages were being prematurely truncated. I found the following helpful comment on birdhouse.org :: Web Dev: “…my weblog was truncated halfway down the page in IE6. I’ve had my share of CSS frustrations, but just could not fathom what bug I might have introduced that could cause this. Yesterday I came across this Zeldman post, and another including a workaround. In a nutshell, the flagship browser used by 187% of the surfing population caches the vertical size of DIVs on pure CSS pages. So if it calculates the height of your .blogbody class on one page at 225 pixels, it may try to render it at the same height on subsequent pages, even though it contains different content. Lovely. Some small relief to know this wasn’t my bug.”

Many thanks to the above posters. I’ve borrowed the solution from this workaround, and pasted the raw javascript into my template.

September 24, 2003

Truncation bug fix
Like many others (apparently), I had found that on occasion my blog pages were being prematurely truncated. I found the following helpful comment on birdhouse.org :: Web Dev: “…my weblog was truncated halfway down the page in IE6. I’ve had my share of CSS frustrations, but just could not fathom what bug I might have introduced that could cause this. Yesterday I came across this Zeldman post, and another including a workaround. In a nutshell, the flagship browser used by 187% of the surfing population caches the vertical size of DIVs on pure CSS pages. So if it calculates the height of your .blogbody class on one page at 225 pixels, it may try to render it at the same height on subsequent pages, even though it contains different content. Lovely. Some small relief to know this wasn’t my bug.”

Many thanks to the above posters. I’ve borrowed the solution from this workaround, and pasted the raw javascript into my template.

September 24, 2003

Broadband In Milton Keynes Saga, Diary Entry 1

High-speed internet access for citizens in Milton Keynes has been a long and slow saga. I won’t recount the history here, but rather point you to a highly informative ‘History of Milton Keynes Telecoms’ site established by Nick Hubbard as part of his influential Milton Keynes Broadband Lobby Group.

On the above Lobby Group site you’ll see notes about what is happening, including a recent meeting with BT in which they described new developments, particulary an extension of the ADSL ‘reach’ using some new line-threshold-tricks, meant to launch today, 24th September. In a constructive spirit, several of us are keeping diaries to record the access changes that result, so here’s mine:

Today is 24th September, when the new longer-reaching broadband is meant to be available.

Step 1: find a sensible URL, so Google broadband BT, which gives me www.bt.com/broadband

Step 2: No obvious ‘news’ anywhere on the site about the 24th September ‘changes’

Step 3: Enter my number into the ‘Broadband Availability Checker’… it comes back with

“For Telephone Number 01908xxxxxxx on Exchange BRADWELL ABBEY
Your exchange has broadband ADSL. However, the length of the telephone line between you and the exchange is too long for broadband ADSL. Thank you for your interest.”

(Same old story, in other words).

Step 4: Follow a couple of other links on the site, notably “Click here to see what’s happening with broadband where I live”, then “Click here to find out if there is already a campaign in your area.”, so I enter my exchange number, 01908, and it says
“No results found”.
Bah. Of course I’ll be emailing this to a rather significant campaign group in Milton Keynes (see above URL), but I’m not sure how anyone else would find it.

Step 5: suppress my frustration, as I’m used to this dead end, get ready to blog this entry (and send it as email to Nick), and resume my normal life.